News & Notices

News from the club and its members and notices.

Program Report: Michael Goodman – The Future of Durham

michaelGoodmanweb.News alert at the Monday lunch:

Expect major announcements “over the next two or three months.”  Yes – that was “announcements” with a very prominent, encouraging and intriguing “S.”

Breaking that welcome tidbit was our featured speaker, Michael Goodman, vice president of real estate for Capitol Broadcasting. Michael and his father, Jim Goodman have make Capital Broadcasting a major player in downtown Durham’s past, present and continuing economic development and cultural renaissance.

“I’m happy,” Goodman told a near full house of Rotarians as he wrapped up an unscripted, far-reaching speech about the future of downtown Durham.  Invited by this week’s Club correspondent to provide added color (within the stringent disclosure constraints that typify all such negotiations and potential announcements) Goodman responded with a flat “no” and chuckled that it was an easy question.

This sounds serious. And encouraging.

In fact, much of Goodman’s presentation was characterized by serious and encouraging facts and opinions about the region’s accomplishments and challenges ahead.

Among his encouraging points:

  • Regional rail is coming to the Triangle region.  “Let’s link it, let’s do it in a really productive way.”
  • American Underground, the Durham incubator to attract, launch and ultimately retain successful entrepreneurial ventures “has really bubbled up.” He described small business start-ups as “a really magical community” that illustrates Durham has “a really good opportunity to keep fostering entrepreneurship.”
  • The RDU region is expected to grow by more than a million people over the next 20 years.

Goodman said he was “distraught as hell” about the serious challenges facing Durham in two areas that our Club and its membership have long worked to improve:  Crime and Education.

“If we can’t get our arms around that we are never going to be the community we can be,” Goodman said, noting discouraging statistics that show widening racial and socioeconomic disparities in educational achievement.

“We should be mad about this,” he said. “We should be working really hard on this.  If we are not working hard on it, we ain’t going to get there.  We have a lot of work to do.  Education is a silver bullet and I truly believe that.”

President Don closed the March 11 meeting by recognizing Goodman’s and his father’s vision, planning and execution reaching back to the earliest days of Durham’s re-emergence.  “You just have to say Wow.”

(Submitted by Mark Lazenby)

 

Rotary Minute: Mark Higgins

MarkHigginswebFrom Animal House to Art Collector.  A good humored delivery has marked many of these Rotary Minutes, so what kind of humor should we expect from the leader of Hall-Wynn Funeral Service and Crematory? Not what you might think. Imagine if you will Mark in an impeccable blue suit and helmet on his motor scooter, Zorro. Or a bunch of college guys making a dorm of the basement of a mortuary. Only once did my eyes catch the eyes of a table mate with the question “what did he mean by that?” when Mark declared that he collected art but mainly he collected people. But he was quick to clarify with a Eudora Welty quote, “I work at keeping my friendships in good repair.”

Mark, we’re glad you chose Durham as a place not to grow up in.

Below is the full text of Mark’s Rotary Minute.

“Where did you grow up?” I am often asked. Answer: I haven’t done that yet. It’s never too late to have a happy childhood. Or, to the question, “where are you from?” Answer: My 3 siblings and I were born in Evanston, IL on Chicago’s north shore, where we lived until I was 12, when my father, a Time Magazine exec, was transferred to Pittsburgh, so I was raised in both wonderful cities. Clueless about career, I figured liberal arts were safe, so I went off to Hope College in Holland, Michigan and majored in Communication. Within weeks, I was in the chow line with a fellow student in uniform, and learned he was a paramedic with a local funeral home that ran a sideline ambulance service. They employed college students to man evenings and weekends. With a possible job opening, I was invited to stop by and go on some calls. At 18, lights and sirens sounded like a blast, so by Thanksgiving I took training and was hired, moving into the basement of the funeral parlor with 5 other students (think, Animal House) to the utter horror of my parents, though quickly buffered by the news they’d be saving on dorm cost. Shortly thereafter, I became intrigued by the upstairs activity of the funeral home and thus began my career discernment. By sophomore year, I was settled on coming into this profession, visualizing myself in a human service endeavor where I might make some difference to people in crisis. Upon graduation I sought an internship in Greensboro, as I had a slew of friends down this way from having been a camp counselor below Charlotte through college summers. I then completed studies at Pittsburgh Institute of Funeral Service and re-joined the firm in Greensboro. A year later, I took a position with the leading Int’l trade association in my field, moving back to my native, Evanston, IL. I stayed 10 years as a consultant and Marketing Director, but with a lingering desire to one day have my own business and work again as a practitioner. During that decade I made incredible contacts, covering 46 states and 8 of 10 Canadian provinces. I am blessed to have friends just about everywhere.

[Read more…]

Rotary Minute: Carolyn Aaronson

CarolynAwebThe general reaction at the table were I was sitting as I took a few notes on Carolyn Aaronson’s Rotary Minute was to wish me good luck on writing it up. The same thing was running through my head until right at the end when Carolyn pulled up a breadbox sized container and opened it to reveal the thousand tiny cranes she had created. The legend goes that whoever creates a thousand origami cranes will have their wish come true, but as Carolyn pointed out, there are no promises about when.

Carolyn pledged that after the meeting she would be at the doorway so everybody could have one of the cranes in the hopes that it would make their wishes come true. This tells us all that we need to know about Carolyn.

First, she creates beautiful things. Besides the cranes she showed us examples of her fabric art and the flower drawings that she is now creating.

Second, she is a warm and generous person. Her contributions of time and money to various rotary projects are well known, the latest being raising a substantial sum for club projects from the sale of valentines that she created.

Third, Carolyn marches to the beat of a drum and bugle corps heavily influenced by reggae, or, said another way, Carolyn is not your typical Rotarian. On the contrary, Carolyn is an example of the type of member that will keep Rotary from being a moribund institution.

CraneWeb

I got my crane and my wish is that Carolyn stays an active member of the club at least as long as I’m in it.

Submitted by Jay Zenner

Rotary Minute: Connie Campanaro

photoconniewebConnie Campanaro fulfilled a lifelong dream with a trip to Italy, where she visited her grandmother’s village.

Unfortunately, she showed up on a holiday when virtually nothing was open. Fortunately, one of the restaurants was hosting a Rotary event. Though she spoke no Italian, she was able to convey that she was a Rotarian and was welcomed with open arms. Not only were she and her family fed well, this Italian Rotary Club helped her hunt down her ancestral home. “I realized, in that moment, that this really is a worldwide organization of brothers and sisters,” Connie said Monday.

It’s a positive reminder that, as Connie prepares to leave Durham after 14 years here – she’s headed back to Buffalo, N.Y. to become the executive director of the Western New York Grantmakers Association – she’ll always have a home wherever Rotarians are gathered. Connie values home, as she spent her formative years bouncing between California and upstate New York. She was married at 16, a mother at 17. “I had the stability I so craved,” she says.

But she and her husband split, and Connie had to figure out how to provide for her two children. She became the first person to attend college and then got into the business side of the arts world, making connections with everyone from “the Bolshoi ballet to L.L. Cool J.” In 1999 she came to Durham to run the flailing Carolina Theatre. “I’m a sucker for an impossible challenge,” she said. She helped the theater back on firm financial footing before stepping down a few years ago. She’s remained active in Durham, and was joined here by her mother and daughter. But her mom has passed, and her daughter is living in Dallas.

Now, it’s time for Connie to move on. “It’s hard to say goodbye,” Connie concluded. “But it’s even harder to mean it.”

Submitted by Matt Dees

Singing Valentine Fund Raiser

Valentine Singers WebThe Singing Valentines fund raiser is a joint effort of Durham Rotary and Heart of Carolina Barbershop Chorus. A quartet from Heart of Carolina came to Rotary on Monday to demonstrate what a Singing Valentine is like. A portion of every singing valentine sold goes to Rotary to help with its scholarship programs. These will sell out fast, so please make your reservation soon! If you your sweetheart isn’t around, then why not consider sending a singing valentine to your favorite nonprofit to show your love for their cause?

Order online at http://www.hoccmusic.org/singing-valentines or by phone 919-730-3342.

Click this link for more information about the options available. 2013SingingValentinesPoster

Submitted by Shelly Green

Howard Clements and Leaders of Tomorrow

HowardClement2webWe haven’t seen much of Howard Clements, a long time Rotarian and City Councilman recently, so it was great to see him and his wife Annie at the meeting on January 14th. Howard came to support of a bunch of very sharp high school students who found an appreciative audience of Rotarians who came early at the request of Immediate Past President Arthur Rogers. The students presented a “case study” of Facebook as part of the Leaders of Tomorrow Program sponsored by the National Black MBA Association. It was great to see Howard and as the pictures illustrate, he seems to be glad to be with us too.HowardClementweb