2012 Community Service Award – Brenda Brodie

The motto for Rotary is “Service Above Self.” The Downtown Rotary Club reserves its highest honor and award to a Non-Rotarian by recognizing one citizen each year that exemplifies this motto.

This year, Dieter Mauch, the Chair of the committee that selects the annual winner, presented the Downtown Durham Rotary Community Service Award to Brenda Barrowclough Brodie.

Ms. Brodie earned the honor for her work in founding SEEDS along with Annice Kenan in 1994 with a mission show people how to care for the earth, themselves and each other through garden based programs in inner city neighborhoods.

The full press release with all the details is available at this link.

While SEEDS is an important program it is only one of many things Ms. Brodie has been involved in. She served on the Board of Trustees of North Carolina Central University for 6 years including a term as Secretary.  She was on the Board of the American Dance Festival for 19 years and President in 1988. She served on the Board of the Durham Arts Council for 14 years and held various offices including President. She is still active with the SarahP. Duke Gardens.

With the Community Service Award, Ms. Brodie was also inducted into the Paul Harris Society and a $1,000 contribution is being  made in her name to the Rotary Foundation.

I first met Brenda casually at a Duke event back in the late 80’s and only found out later that she was married to Keith Brodie, the President of Duke. Frankly I was a little surprised about the connection because she is so unassuming, approachable and even humble, certainly not what I had expected of the president of a prestigious university.  Many years later I got to know her better when I moved to Forest Hillsand became a neighbor. But our most common bond was through another neighbor who became a close mutual friend.

This was a much better vantage point to observe the kindness and unselfishness of both Brenda and Keith and explains why she has quietly worked behind the scenes at SEEDS to help so many people.

I didn’t know before she was nominated for this award that her father had been a Rotarian for 50 years, but it is certainly no surprise because she so exemplifies Service Above Self.

Submitted by Jay Zenner

Chicago Tickets Still Available

Tickets are still available but going fast for the Club’s evening at the Durham Performing Arts Center for a performance of Chicago with Christie Brinkley. All the details are here on the calendar for Wednesday August 1. Join the party and help raise money for the Durham Rotary Scholarship fund. 

Paul Harris Fellow: Courtney James

Foundation Chair Andy Barada inducted Rotarian Courtney James into the Paul Harris Society at the club meeting on June 18th. Courtney is a local Realtor and founder of Urban Durham Realty which is rapidly becoming Durham’s premier homegrown residential real estate brokerage firm. Courtney is a graduate of Vanderbilt University in Nashville. Her husband Luke and their three daughters live in Forest Hills just a bike ride away from her offices in Downtown Durham.

Rotarians become Paul Harris Fellows when their contributions to the Rotary Foundation reach $1,000.

Program Report: Bill Kalkhof and DDI

Rotarian Steed Rollins introduced fellow Rotarian Bill Kalkhof, President of Downtown Durham Inc. for a report on developments in our Downtown.

I’ve reported at least two other presentations Bill has given to the Club and each time I’ve been faced with the same dilemma. Bill delivers so much information in such a rapid fire style that there is no way to capture more than the essence of it in 400 words. So this time I’m not going to even try. Instead I’d like to share a few impressions that may bring some perspective especially for newer residents of Durham and members of the club.

First, I have never heard Bill speak when he didn’t acknowledge that I was on the original board of DDI if he knew I was in the audience even though it has been at least 15 years since I’ve had an active role in the organization. Effective leaders instinctively do a lot of that kind of stuff and Bill is great at it. [Read more…]

Program Report: The Dixie Classic

The Classic: How Everett Case and His Tournament Brought Big Time Basketball to the South—Bethany Bradsher

Prior to the frenzied atmosphere of ACC basketball tournaments and “March Madness,” the Dixie Classic was one of college’s premier hoops events.  The brainchild of legendary NC State basketball coach Everett Case, the Dixie Classic was launched in 1949 and ran until 1961 when a point-shaving scandal organized byNew Yorkarea mobsters led to its demise.  Tipping off just after Christmas in Reynolds Coliseum on the NC State Campus, the tournament was played over three days.  The holiday event opened with each of the Big Four—NC State, UNC, Duke and Wake Forest—playing non-conference opponents selected from some of the most competitive programs in the country including Penn State, Minnesota, Cincinnati (remember Oscar Robertson) and Johnny Green at  Michigan State.  During the Everett Case era, NC State dominated league play and practically owned the Dixie Classic.  In its twelve year history, the Wolfpack won the tournament seven times; UNC captured three titles; and Duke andWakeForesteked out one apiece.  No outside team ever won, but a few came close.

Bethany Bradsher gave a riveting account of the Dixie Classic.  Bethanyis the author of The Classic: How Everett Case and His Tournament Brought Big Time Basketball to the South.  A sports nut since childhood in Houston, she became interested in ACC athletics when she came to college in North Carolina and since the mid-1990s has been covering ACC sports as a journalist.  Casting around for an interesting sports story after having written Coaching Third, a baseball biography, a friend suggested the Dixie Classic.  She realized she was on to a great story when she saw “grown men’s eyes light up at the mention of the Dixie Classic.”  Interviews with fans—some of whom had been boys whose Christmases were made by Santa who left tickets to the Classic in their stockings—and former players brought passion and detail to the book.  One of those interviewees was club member Bucky Waters who played on an Everett Case team in the Dixie Classic era. [Read more…]

Program Report: NC’s Copy of the Bill of Rights

Toby Barfield summed up what most of us were thinking. “This is the most fascinating program I think we’ve ever had,” he told N.C. Supreme Court Justice Paul Newby after a rapid-fire recitation of the saga of our state’s copy of the Bill of Rights.

Keith Burns, who we learned is this year’s winner of the state Bar Association’s Citizen Lawyer Award, introduced his friend the justice as a stand-up guy in addition to a brilliant legal mind. Justice Newby, mixing humor with an engrossing storytelling style, didn’t disappoint.

It’s impossible to capture all the twists and turns of the story in this space, but here’s a synopsis: A Union soldier helping occupy Raleigh made off with our copy of the Bill of Rights. (Newby noted that North Carolina has a singular relationship with that sacred document, as our leaders refused to ratify the Constitution until those positive affirmations of our most basic rights were made the law of the land. Who knew?) The soldier sold the document to an Indianapolis man, Charles Shotwell, for $5. When our attorney general wrote to the Indiana attorney general asking for the document to be returned, he essentially was told, “No. You seceded, you lost, you lose.” [Read more…]