REMINDER

Today’s meeting will be held at
HI-WIRE BREWING
Meeting Room: HI-WIRE TAPROOM
800 Taylor Street Durham

Program Report: Goldie Byrd – Alzheimer’s

 

Judy Kinney, who runs the Durham Center for Senior Life and has been a member of the Club since November, introduced Dr. Goldie Byrd, the project leader for the Alzheimer’s & Dementia Disparities Engagement Network as well as the Executive Director of the Center for Outreach in Alzheimer’s Aging and Community Health (COAACH) at North Carolina A&T State University in Greensboro.  

Dr. Byrd began with some of the basics of the disease. Alzheimer’s, of course, is one type of dementia. There is no cure and nothing that slows down the progression.  The primary risk factor is age…it’s a disease that slowly destroys the brain and may be doing so for 15 years before any symptoms emerge. Ultimately it leads to death. 1 in 3 seniors will die of Alzheimer’s. 

Dr. Byrd was handicapped by having to condense a much longer presentation into 20 minutes, however, she approached it with good humor and several important themes emerged. 

First, if there is anything we can do ourselves to avoid or delay the disease is to TAKE CARE OF OURSELVES. She pointed out that Alzheimer’s is a neurological disease and the best defense is the same thing recommended for cardiovascular disease and lots of other problems that old age can bring with it, that is, healthy diet, exercise, stress reduction and, above all, don’t smoke.  The stress reduction piece of this formula always surprises me, but she pointed out that approaching life cheerfully reduces the chemicals the flood our system and protected us when avoiding saber tooth tigers was a major concern. I guess nobody lived long enough to get Alzheimer’s, which was only identified as a separate disease in 1906. Maintaining close relationships and keeping your mind active is also important.  [Read more…]

Program Report: Park and Rec – Tom Dawson and Jason Jones

I don’t know if it was done on purpose but the previous week’s presentation from Rotarian Ashleigh Bachert about the Durham Sports Commission that she heads, but this week’s presentation from two of the assistant Directors of Durham’s Parks and Recreation department seemed to be the other side of the same coin.

Whereas a good deal of the focus of the Sports Commission is bringing events to the community along with dollars and hotel room nights, the Parks and Recreation Department focuses on Durham citizens. There is considerable overlap however in both the areas of facilities and in programming.

Our speakers, introduced by Danielle Kaspar (pinch hitting for Michael Kriston,) represented the two main arms of the department touching the public directly. The first to speak was Tom Dawson, a landscape architect by training, responsible for Parks and Planning. Jason Jones is a Certified Parks and Recreation Professional (CPRP) and responsible for the programs organized for all those facilities. They compose half of the leadership team of the department that is directed by Rhonda Parker and includes Joy Guy, who handles Administration.

Listening to these guys was a bit humbling for me, a guy who has been around a long time here in Durham and a has been jock. I learned a lot. The first surprise was the scope of activities and facilities. 69 Parks? Who knew? 57 Playgrounds, 5 pools on over 2000 acres.

[Read more…]

New Member: King Kenny

King Kenney is Marketing Director at Duke Performances and Executive Director atSuperLit. King is a reputable insider with a unique understanding of how to inspire action.

As a copywriter and journalist, King regularly delivers engaging content to target audiences of diverse sorts. As a Founder and Director, he has a demonstrated history of empowering
communities with the message needed to seek cures for various ills that cause cyclical poverty.

King’s Sponsor is Sara Stephens. Welcome, King!

New Member: Bob Wiley

Bob Wiley is a Seattle area native. He attended Prep School, College and Business School in the Boston area.

He worked in consulting and in the investment business in Boston and New York.

Bob’s father (89 years old) has been a Rotarian for almost 50 years. In 1999, Bob joined Seattle # 4, established in 1910. At that time, it was the largest Club in the world with over 700
Members.

Bob enjoys music and the arts, hiking, sailing, and he is also a history buff.

He knows the difference active Rotarians can make in a community and from he sees after visitingwith us for several Meetings, this Club is clearly doing that. Bob stated that “he feels like he’s in the right room.”

Bob’s Sponsor is Bob Gutman. Welcome, Bob!

Program: Ashleigh Bachert – Durham Sports Commission

I took a look at the Durham Sports Commission’s website in preparation for writing this and noted that besides our speaker, Executive Director and Rotarian Ashleigh Bachert, the Durham Rotary Club is very involved. Rotarian Ingrid Wicker-McCree the Athletic Director at NCCU, and honorary member Dan Hill, who introduced Ashleigh are both on the board. Also on the board is former member Bill Kalkhof, the retired President of Downtown Durham Inc. Rotarians Shelly Green, the current head of Discover Durham and her successor Susan Amey were there at the meeting. Discover Durham nursed the Commission into existence and currently shelters and otherwise supports it. No doubt the city and county officials in attendance had a roll as well.

Ms. Bachert must have taken lessons from Kalkhof, whose updates on Downtown Durham were rapid fire and jammed with statistics and other facts that were impossible to summarize in these program write-ups.

Even if you didn’t know it already, the genesis of the Sports Commission in Discover Durham was pretty obvious with its emphasis on attracting sporting events to Durham to bring fans into town to spend their money and enjoy all of our attractions. Sports tourism is what Ms. Bachert called it.

Dan Hill introduced Ashleigh Bachert

To illustrate how this happens, Ms. Bachert went through an example of what it would cost a family to have an 11-year-old to play basketball competitively…it added up to about $20,000 annually. This would have shocked my father, whose primary investment for me when I was playing high school sports was fifty cents per practice for the two root beers from the drink machine that I would chug afterwards. If it was going to cost him even the 60’s equivalent of $20K I would have had to have been satisfied with a plywood backboard in the yard and a free library card.

[Read more…]